ABOUT ALEGRA ALLY

Alegra Ally is ethnographer and award-winning explorer and photographer, best known for her in-depth work focusing on indigenous women. Her ability to produce photographs with profound emotional resonance and sensitivity earned her the Scott Pearlman Field Award for her expedition: ‘Women at the End of the Land’ in 2016 and dozens of other international awards both from the photography and exploration communities.  

Ally first travelled solo to Papua New Guinea in 1997 at the age of 17, where she spent months living remote tribes. She crossed the Sepik River by canoe twice, trekked the Kokoda Trail, and became initiated into one of the Sepik tribes as well as into the Kosua tribe. Her first book describing her travels in Papua, “Touching Genesis”, was published in 2001.

Ally’s photography is featured in several publications. The New York Times, Huffington Post, The Walt Disney Company, Maptia, Ocean Geographic, Sidetracked and more. 

She serves as a member in the Scott Pearlman Field award and the Flag and Honours Committees of The Explorers Club

Recently she was invited to serve as an advisor to the BBC Natural History Unit for a “Human Planet” series. As an internationally recognised speaker Ally was invited to present the Wild Born Project in several midwifery organisations, including midwifery departments at various hospitals, photography schools and the Explorers Club Headquarters. 

Ally is currently writing her theses as pert for her Masters Of Research degree with focus on Anthropology at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia.

She lives in Sydney with her husband Erez Beatus and is expecting their first child.

Together, they operate Freediving Holidays, leading expeditions to Hawaii, Mexico and Tonga

WOMEN AT THE END OF THE LAND: THE BOOK

A close collaboration with writer Kim Frank, this photography book will share a rich and detailed glimpse into Lena’s birth journey, as well as explore Alegra’s experiences documenting the Nenets’ daily lives at a time of great change in their history, when rapid climate change and industrial development pose a significant threat to their unique way of life.

The expedition to Siberia raised more then 30,000 dollars with Kickstarter, and ranked as one of Kickstarter most favourite photographic projects. The expedition was also awarded with the prestige Flag by the Explorers Club.